6.1. COMPATIBILITY

Ultimate Memory Guide. 6.1. COMPATIBILITY

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6.1. COMPATIBILITY

As mentioned earlier, compatibility of memory components with your computer system is arguably the most important factor to consider when upgrading memory. This section can get you started; it also makes frequent mention of the advantages of using a memory configurator.

WHAT KIND OF MEMORY IS COMPATIBLE WITH MY SYSTEM?

The easiest way to determine what type of memory goes with your system is to consult with your system documentation. If you need further assistance, consult a memory configurator available from many sources, including Kingston. Kingston and other brand-name memory companies offer such a tool to help you find the right memory configuration for your system.

With Kingston’s configurator, you can search by five different criteria:

  • System manufacturer/model
  • Computer model name
  • Memory module part number (Kingston, distributor, manufacturer)
  • Specification
  • Generic memory
To access Kingston’s Memory Configurator, click here

WHAT IF I CAN’T FIND MY SYSTEM IN A MEMORY CONFIGURATOR?

If you can’t find your system in the memory configuration programs, you can still find out what kind of memory you need by consulting the manual that came with your system. In most cases, the manual will provide basic specifications such as the speed and technology of the memory you need. This information is usually enough to choose a module by specification. If you don’t feel you have enough information, you can call your system manufacturer or Kingston’s toll-free technical support number for assistance.

HOW MANY SOCKETS DO I HAVE OPEN?

You may or may not have an idea what the inside of your computer looks like and how memory is configured. You may have opened up your computer when you bought it to see the configuration inside, or you may have looked at a configuration diagram in your user’s manual. Even if you have no idea of the memory configuration of your system, you can use Kingston’s memory configuration tools to find out. For each system, the configuration includes a diagram, called a bank schema, which indicates how the memory sockets are arranged in your system and what the basic configuration rules are. The simple tutorial on the next page outlines how to use a bank schema diagram to determine the number of sockets in your system and how to fill them.

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